Thursday, August 14, 2008

Iban may appeal

There's still hope for Iban. According to his lawyer, José Rodriguez, he may appeal the CAS' decision to suspend him. Iban has two possibilities; he can appeal to the Swiss Federal Court, or to the Comité Español de Disciplina Deportiva. Rodriguez says it's likely that they will continue the quest to clear Iban's name, but that the decision on whether to appeal or not lies only with Iban. Today's DEIA includes an extensive feature on Iban's case, and all the flaws in the process, and is definetely worth a read. Many of you sceptics might change your minds if you choose to read it. I'd love to translate it all for you, but it's too difficult to be honest. My English vocabulary doesn't include all those doping-related expressions. But definetely worth to check out: http://www.deia.com/es/impresa/2008/08/13/bizkaia/kirolak/490920.php

5 comments:

Bolsen3 said...

Can't really see this changing my mind much. Didn't understand it all, but anyway; the man is judged, by both the UCI and CAS, and I actually trust them more than some Spanish journalist. Okay, maybe some mistakes was made here and there, but don't you think CAS knew all about that when they made their decision? Obviously they think the evidence is good enough to prove that Iban used EPO. And as long as thats the ruling, I support it 100% . The sport cycling means so much more to me now, than the person Iban Mayo. It will be exiting to see if he challenges the judgment or not (but I'm afraid he'll just end up looking as stupid as the bastard Floyd Landis)...

Anonymous said...

What really disappoints me is that cycling and doping consistently are synonomous with denial of the truth; "I didnt dope", "I never tested positive for a performance enhancing drug", etc etc. If someone is caught doping, they will deny it to the bitter end, until they absolutely have to concede. Then...the real story comes out and boy, is it colorful and premeditated. I recently read that Americans view doping as a character flaw, "a bad person", while Europeans view doping as, "part of the job". I realize this is a generalization but the point is that for many, doping is part of the deal and "everyone's doing it".

The real disappointment is the innocent, clean people who perform extraordinarily are consistently questioned if they are clean or not. Will we ever know the truth about a cyclist?

Anonymous said...

I was a huge mayo fan but now as far as i am concerned,good ridance.He has obviously doped throughout his career and now the jig is up.He must have lied to all around him for years including his friends,family and fans.I can't believe he was stupid enough to think that he would not get caught,and now he thinks about an appeal.What a stupid lying cheat.

Anonymous said...

Iban, stop it now. In 11 months you'll be back. Confess and tell everything you know about your doctors, even if it's just Losa and Fuentes.

Bolsen3 said...

I think there's a big difference in attitude between various parts of Europe. Here in Scandinavia most people definitely looks at doping as bad and wrong. We don't have much respect for people who choose to cheat their way up in sports, very much like the American attitude you describe...

 

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